Last wishes

7th Sunday of Easter (May 12, 2013)
Common Lectionary Readings:
Acts 16:16-34; Psalm 97; Revelation 22:12-21; John 17:20-26

We have just two weeks left in the MCC Jordan office before beginning a three-week period of transition with incoming MCC Reps Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen. Our time now is spent tidying up loose ends and preparing for the transition.

Following is a reflection that Cindy shared in a recent workshop via Skype with Illinois Mennonite Conference:

These girls from Baghdad are among tens of thousands of Iraqis for whom Amman is a temporary home while awaiting resettlement

These girls from Baghdad are among tens of thousands of Iraqis for whom Amman is a temporary home while awaiting resettlement

During the past year I have had the privilege of teaching ESL classes for groups of Iraqi adults, elementary and junior high students at a small Chaldean Catholic church near the MCC office in Amman. These students are part of a refugee community here in Amman, awaiting resettlement to a third country.

Their priest, Father Raymond, says Iraqi refugees began coming to Jordan in 1991 after the invasion of Kuwait and the first Gulf War. At the peak, he estimates 700,000 Iraqis – Muslims and Christians – were in Jordan. Some 35,000 – 40,000 of this number were Chaldean Catholics.

Now, more than 20 years later, he estimates there are still 200,000 Iraqi refugees in Jordan – including 10,000-15,000 Chaldean Christians. There is a steady flow of resettlement, with Iraqis going to Australia, the United States, Canada, Sweden, and most recently, to Germany. In the U.S. many Chaldean Catholics are resettling in Detroit and San Diego. Chicago has a large Iraqi Assyrian Catholic community.

The children in my English classes, ages 7-16, have been in Jordan for anywhere between 1 to 9 years. Most come from Baghdad, but some come from Mosul and Basra. They say their families left Iraq because the war made life very difficult and unsafe. They will be resettling in Germany and the United States. Most don’t know when; but Ivan, whose family has been in Jordan for 2 years, excitedly explained that his family will move to Detroit at the end of May. The reality is that families are constantly leaving to begin their new lives, and other families are arriving to Jordan from Iraq to take their places.

MCC U.S. writer LInda Espenshade (right) talks with an Iraqi woman who is part of the higher education program run by MCC partner Jesuit Refugee Services

MCC U.S. writer LInda Espenshade (right) talks with an Iraqi woman who is part of the higher education program run by MCC partner Jesuit Refugee Services

My adult class includes 25-30 men and women, ages 15-76, keen to practice English with someone who has an American accent! They want to learn “survival” English — how to meet people, engage in small talk, shop, order dinner at a restaurant, catch a taxi and the list goes on.

My students are so motivated, appreciative and upbeat. But one gentleman confided, “You see us joking and laughing, but every Iraqi’s heart is sad.”

During one class I had my students write and share their hopes and dreams. One woman wrote: “I always dream I am with our children. I have four children and they have all moved away. Two daughters live in Canada. One daughter lives in the United States. One son lives in Sydney. They are all married. When I pray I beg God to let me see them. It’s a dream to me now, but I am patient. Patience and time bring everything to bear.”

Like this Iraqi woman, the Common Lectionary readings this week are about last wishes.

In the reading from Acts, a jailer charged with guarding Paul and Silas fears for his life when an earthquake breaks open the prison where his prisoners are singing and praying while locked in chains (Acts 16:26). But none of the prisoners choose to escape. So impressed by their example, the jailer asks Paul and Silas, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?” (v.30) Paul and Silas take the opportunity to introduce the jailer and his household to Jesus.

On Orthodox Easter Sunday, we were invited to the home of Jordanian friends for lunch.  The remains a a 5th century Byzantine Church were recently discovered on their property during construction of a road connecting Amman with the Queen Alia Airport.

On Orthodox Easter Sunday, we were invited to the home of Jordanian friends for lunch. The remains of this 5th century Byzantine church were recently discovered on their property during construction of a road connecting Amman with the Queen Alia Airport.

In the reading from Revelation, Jesus – described as “the Alpha and Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end” (Rev. 22:13) – expresses his desire: “Let everyone who is thirsty come. Let anyone who wishes to take the water of life as a gift.” (v.17)

In the Gospel reading, shortly before returning to heaven, Jesus prays for his disciples and those who will succeed them. His last desire for his followers is that they “may be one” (John 17:21-23). For it is only through the unity and love demonstrated by followers of Jesus that the world will come to know him (vv. 21, 23).

Really, could our granddaughter get any cuter?

Really, could our granddaughter get any cuter?

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