Tag Archives: Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen

From all nations

Second Sunday after Pentecost (June 2, 2013)
Common Lectionary Readings:
I Kings 8:22-23, 41-43; Psalm 96; Galatians 1:1-12; Luke 7:1-10

This week we traveled to northern Iraq to introduce Carolyne and Gordon to MCC Iraq partners; then on to Istanbul to meet with Iran partners and Amela Puljek-Shank, MCC’s area director for Europe and the Middle East.

Cindy with Hero Brzw, who graduated from Eastern Mennonite University's Center for Justice  Peacebuilding and now works in northern Iraq

Cindy with Hero Brzw, who graduated from Eastern Mennonite University’s Center for Justice Peacebuilding and now works in northern Iraq

Jim and Deb Fine, MCC Iraq program coordinator and English teacher, respectively, did a wonderful job of hosting us in Iraq. We traveled to all corners of the Kurdish region of Iraq, meeting with partners who have become close friends across the years. It was a great opportunity to reminisce about changes during the six years we have lived in the region.

Jim Fine, with sisters from the Daughters of Mary in al Qosh

Jim Fine, with sisters from the Daughters of Mary in al Qosh

Cindy fulfilled a long-term wish by attending the kindergarten graduation at Kids House in Ankawa, May 29. In previous years we have always been speaking in Canada or the U.S. during the first-rate kindergarten performance. Kids House – a MCC Global Family partner – is operated by the Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus.

Kids House dancers at graduation program, May 29 (photo by Jim Fine)

Kids House dancers at graduation program, May 29 (photo by Jim Fine)

The Common Lectionary readings remind us the God cannot be contained, constrained or controlled by one people group. Rather, all nations are to worship God and examples of active faith are found in every community.

Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen buying a carpet in Erbil

Deb Fine (left) helps Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen buy a carpet at the bazaar in Erbil

At the dedication of his magnificent temple, Solomon offered an insightful and inclusive prayer: “When a foreigner comes and prays towards this house, then hear in heaven your dwelling-place, and do according to all that the foreigner calls to you, so that all the peoples of the earth may know your name and fear you. . .” (I Kings 8:42-43).

With Dana Hassan, former director of MCC partner REACH, in Suliemaniyah

With Dana Hassan, former director of MCC partner REACH, in Suliemaniyah

Similarly, the psalmist has a broad understanding of the reach of God’s glory and grace. “Declare (God’s) glory among the nations,” the psalmist urges, “his marvelous works among all the peoples.” (Ps. 96:3)

Jesus heals a Roman centurion’s slave after the centurion says that he trusts Jesus to perform this miracle without even coming to his home. “I tell you,” Jesus marvels, “not even in Israel have I found such faith.” (Luke 7:9).

Carolyne looks at a photo with one of the children at St. Anne's Orphanage in al Qosh

Carolyne looks at a photo with one of the youth at St. Anne’s Orphanage in al Qosh

During our six years in the Middle East we have experienced God’s goodness and blessing in the relationships with people from many nations and faith traditions. Thanks be to God!

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Inseparably intertwined

Trinity Sunday (May 26, 2013)
Common Lectionary Readings:
Proverbs 8:1-4, 22-31; Psalm 8; Romans 5:1-5; John 16:12-15

On Tuesday this week Cindy taught her last English class with Iraqi students here in Amman. Her students threw a party in her honor. For nearly a year now Cindy has been teaching ESL classes for children and adults at the Chaldean Catholic church near the MCC offices in Jabal Webdah.

Cindy with some of her students at the Chaldean Catholic church in Amman

Cindy with some of her students at the Chaldean Catholic church in Amman (photo by Fr. Raymond)

On Wednesday we hosted a lunch for young adult staff from several MCC partners here in Amman. Daryl made West African Groundnut Stew (More-with-Less Cookbook, page 172) for the occasion. We have been inspired by the vision and commitment of many young adults who work with NGOs in Jordan.

On Thursday Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen finished their four-month formal Arabic language training. We now begin a three-week orientation period as they assume the MCC Rep role here in Jordan in mid-June.

Carolyne and Gordon with Mark LaChonce, the director of their Arabic language school

Carolyne and Gordon with Mark LaChonce, the director of their Arabic language school

Saturday morning we fly to northern Iraq to introduce the Epp-Fransen’s to MCC Iraq partners; then on to Istanbul where we will meet with one of MCC’s key Iran partners. Getting visas to Iran is not possible due to the upcoming presidential elections.

In the region this week:

  • UNHCR announced a temporary lull in the arrival of Syrian refugees to Jordan due to intensified fighting on the Syrian-Jordanian border, making it difficult for refugees to cross. On Thursday the World Bank announced that it will provide $150 million of economic support to Jordan to assist with the cost of hosting the refugees. Jordan is currently hosting 540,000 Syrians.
Syrian children haul mattresses into one-room caravan homes at Za'atari Camp (photo by Muath Freij for the Jordan Times)

Syrian children haul mattresses into a one-room caravan home at Za’atari Camp (photo by Muath Freij for the Jordan Times)

  • Syrian opposition leaders began three days of talks in Istanbul, seeking a political solution to the conflict which has taken the lives of some 80,000 Syrians and uprooted an additional 5 million.
Jordanian demonstrators outside the Iraqi embassy in Amman (AP photo in Jordan Times)

Anti-riot police outside the Iraqi embassy in Amman (AP photo in Jordan Times)

The Common Lectionary readings for this Trinity Sunday highlight the interwoven relationships between members of the Trinity.

God, who is Creator and Sovereign, gives humans dominion over creation (Ps. 8) and shares everything with Jesus Christ, God’s son (John 16:15).

Jesus Christ is co-creator with God (Prov. 8:22-31) and mediator between God and humanity. “We have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ,” Paul declares (Rom. 5:1).

“God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit,” Paul continues (Rom. 5:5). In addition to being the channel of God’s love, the Spirit guides humanity into all the truth, glorifying and bearing witness to Jesus (John 16:13-15).

Such collaboration and unselfish interaction are rare. Indeed, the relationship between the members of the Trinity is a powerful example of the kind of unity that God desires for the human community as well. In a world torn by divisions and fighting, may such unity be so!

Granddaughter Sydney tests the waters and decides it's too cold to climb in (photo by Holden Byler)

Granddaughter Sydney tests the waters and decides it’s too cold to climb in (photo by Holden Byler)

Last wishes

7th Sunday of Easter (May 12, 2013)
Common Lectionary Readings:
Acts 16:16-34; Psalm 97; Revelation 22:12-21; John 17:20-26

We have just two weeks left in the MCC Jordan office before beginning a three-week period of transition with incoming MCC Reps Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen. Our time now is spent tidying up loose ends and preparing for the transition.

Following is a reflection that Cindy shared in a recent workshop via Skype with Illinois Mennonite Conference:

These girls from Baghdad are among tens of thousands of Iraqis for whom Amman is a temporary home while awaiting resettlement

These girls from Baghdad are among tens of thousands of Iraqis for whom Amman is a temporary home while awaiting resettlement

During the past year I have had the privilege of teaching ESL classes for groups of Iraqi adults, elementary and junior high students at a small Chaldean Catholic church near the MCC office in Amman. These students are part of a refugee community here in Amman, awaiting resettlement to a third country.

Their priest, Father Raymond, says Iraqi refugees began coming to Jordan in 1991 after the invasion of Kuwait and the first Gulf War. At the peak, he estimates 700,000 Iraqis – Muslims and Christians – were in Jordan. Some 35,000 – 40,000 of this number were Chaldean Catholics.

Now, more than 20 years later, he estimates there are still 200,000 Iraqi refugees in Jordan – including 10,000-15,000 Chaldean Christians. There is a steady flow of resettlement, with Iraqis going to Australia, the United States, Canada, Sweden, and most recently, to Germany. In the U.S. many Chaldean Catholics are resettling in Detroit and San Diego. Chicago has a large Iraqi Assyrian Catholic community.

The children in my English classes, ages 7-16, have been in Jordan for anywhere between 1 to 9 years. Most come from Baghdad, but some come from Mosul and Basra. They say their families left Iraq because the war made life very difficult and unsafe. They will be resettling in Germany and the United States. Most don’t know when; but Ivan, whose family has been in Jordan for 2 years, excitedly explained that his family will move to Detroit at the end of May. The reality is that families are constantly leaving to begin their new lives, and other families are arriving to Jordan from Iraq to take their places.

MCC U.S. writer LInda Espenshade (right) talks with an Iraqi woman who is part of the higher education program run by MCC partner Jesuit Refugee Services

MCC U.S. writer LInda Espenshade (right) talks with an Iraqi woman who is part of the higher education program run by MCC partner Jesuit Refugee Services

My adult class includes 25-30 men and women, ages 15-76, keen to practice English with someone who has an American accent! They want to learn “survival” English — how to meet people, engage in small talk, shop, order dinner at a restaurant, catch a taxi and the list goes on.

My students are so motivated, appreciative and upbeat. But one gentleman confided, “You see us joking and laughing, but every Iraqi’s heart is sad.”

During one class I had my students write and share their hopes and dreams. One woman wrote: “I always dream I am with our children. I have four children and they have all moved away. Two daughters live in Canada. One daughter lives in the United States. One son lives in Sydney. They are all married. When I pray I beg God to let me see them. It’s a dream to me now, but I am patient. Patience and time bring everything to bear.”

Like this Iraqi woman, the Common Lectionary readings this week are about last wishes.

In the reading from Acts, a jailer charged with guarding Paul and Silas fears for his life when an earthquake breaks open the prison where his prisoners are singing and praying while locked in chains (Acts 16:26). But none of the prisoners choose to escape. So impressed by their example, the jailer asks Paul and Silas, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?” (v.30) Paul and Silas take the opportunity to introduce the jailer and his household to Jesus.

On Orthodox Easter Sunday, we were invited to the home of Jordanian friends for lunch.  The remains a a 5th century Byzantine Church were recently discovered on their property during construction of a road connecting Amman with the Queen Alia Airport.

On Orthodox Easter Sunday, we were invited to the home of Jordanian friends for lunch. The remains of this 5th century Byzantine church were recently discovered on their property during construction of a road connecting Amman with the Queen Alia Airport.

In the reading from Revelation, Jesus – described as “the Alpha and Omega, the first and the last, the beginning and the end” (Rev. 22:13) – expresses his desire: “Let everyone who is thirsty come. Let anyone who wishes to take the water of life as a gift.” (v.17)

In the Gospel reading, shortly before returning to heaven, Jesus prays for his disciples and those who will succeed them. His last desire for his followers is that they “may be one” (John 17:21-23). For it is only through the unity and love demonstrated by followers of Jesus that the world will come to know him (vv. 21, 23).

Really, could our granddaughter get any cuter?

Really, could our granddaughter get any cuter?

Extreme makeovers

2nd Sunday after Epiphany (January 20, 2013)
Common Lectionary Readings:
Is. 62:1-5; Ps. 36:5-10; I Cor. 12:1-11; John 2:1-11

The directors of MCC’s three advocacy offices visited us in Amman this week to learn about the Syrian refugee situation in Jordan.

Rachelle Lyndaker Schlabach visits with Caritas Jordan emergency response coordinator, Jameel Dababneh outside a distribution center in Amman

Rachelle Lyndaker Schlabach visits with Caritas Jordan emergency response coordinator, Jameel Dababneh outside a distribution center in Amman

Rachelle Lyndaker Schlabach (MCC Washington), Paul Heidebrecht (MCC Ottawa) and Doug Hostetter (MCC United Nations) met with several refugee families and with MCC Jordan partners who are assisting some of the nearly 300,000 Syrians now living in Jordan.  The most recent issue of MCC’s a Common Place magazine features the stories of MCC partners working with refugees in Jordan.

Rachelle, Paul and Doug with Dr. Kamal Abu Jaber, director of the Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies

Rachelle, Paul and Doug with Dr. Kamal Abu Jaber, director of the Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies

The large influx of refugees is putting strong upward pressure on food and housing prices in Jordan and, in some cases, creating tensions between the refugees and Jordanian host communities.

7-year-old Ghadeer (right) served us tea at her family's one-room flat in Amman

7-year-old Ghadeer (right) served us tea at her family’s one-room flat in Amman (photo by Doug Hostetter)

In the Ashrafiyeh neighborhood of Amman, we visited a Syrian family with four small children, living in a one-room flat.  The father earns $125 per month selling clothing.  The rent on their flat costs $100 per month, forcing the family to take out loans to make ends meet.  In spite of the hardships the family has encountered, they welcomed us in their home and the 7-year-old daughter served us tea.

On Friday, we welcomed Carolyne and Gordon Epp-Fransen from Winnipeg, Manitoba. They will be studying Arabic until summer when they succeed us as MCC Reps in Amman.

Gordon and Carolyne Epp-Fransen from Winnipeg will become new MCC Reps in summer of 2013

Gordon and Carolyne Epp-Fransen from Winnipeg will become new MCC Reps in summer of 2013

In the region this week:

  • The Jordanian government announced a contract with MCC partner the Royal Institute for Interfaith Studies (RIIS) to promote the Amman Message in the Middle East and Europe.  The Amman Message – which, according to the Jordan Times “seeks to affirm what Islam is and what it is not, and what actions represent it and what actions do not” — was released by His Majesty King Abdullah in November 2004.  “The promotion of the Amman Message reminds Muslims themselves of the true nature of their religion,” said Dr. Kamal Abu Jaber, director of the RIIS. “It is not the terrorist ugly faith that is presented sometimes by the Islamophobia in the West.”

The Common Lectionary readings for this second Sunday after Epiphany highlight extreme makeovers and second chances.

In the Old Testament reading, after a period of exile and shame, God’s wayward people receive a new name and a second chance.  “You shall no more be termed Forsaken, and your land shall no more be termed Desolate,” God promises, “but you shall be called My Delight Is in Her, and your land Married.” (Is. 62:4)

The psalmist contrasts the wicked who do not fear God or do good, who are full of deceit and who plot mischief and evil, with those who drink from the river of God’s delights.  “For with you is the fountain of life,” the psalmist proclaims. “In your light we see light.” (Ps. 36:9)

Our granddaughter Sydney examines a snowflake (photo by Holden Byler)

Our granddaughter Sydney examines a snowflake outside her home in Virginia (photo by Holden Byler)

In the Gospel reading, Jesus turns water into wine at a wedding feast in Cana (John 2:1-11).  In a dramatic sign of the theological shift from law to grace, Jesus transforms the water in six large stone jars used for Jewish rites of purification into the finest wine for joyful wedding guests.

In the Epistle reading, God’s Spirit activates gifts in each member of the community, transforming self-interested individuals into ministers for the common good. (I Cor. 12:1-11).

With all the brokenness around us, it is encouraging to know that God is in the business of extreme makeovers – transforming exile and shame into intimacy and delight; legalism into grace and celebration; and self-seeking individuals into a caring community.